Do I Need an Attorney? The Right Way to do Bankruptcy

If you are someone who admits to being a dedicated do-it-yourself sort of person, you have to change your mindset if you are about to file for bankruptcy. You may have seen the do it yourself or for dumbbells guides to bankruptcy, and you may even believe you can handle the many steps involved, but that is a bit of a delusion.

Can you get collection calls to stop? How do you get the bank to stop their foreclosure process? What about the repossession of the family car? Can you make a few calls and get the wage garnishments lifted? You see, a good bankruptcy attorney CAN do such things as part of his or her work for you.

What else can this professional do? If you are just now beginning to consider claiming bankruptcy, you have to know which Chapter is the right one for you. The two most common approaches for a consumer are through Chapter 7 and through Chapter 13. The Chapter 7 type is the one that indicates that you will be entirely unable to meet the demands for payment on your debts. It is the wipe the slate clean sort of venture that requires a lot of knowledge about assets, income, and more.

The Chapter 13 is just as complicated because it is a way to reduce or eliminate some debts, but you need to have steady income and the ability to stick to the payment program that the courts agree to. The trick here is to know what you might feasibly be able to do, financially, in the future, and whether this is the best choice for you.

Consider too that a good attorney will better understand the long term implications of your choices. For example, how will this impact your credit or your ability to get a loan? The right attorney can help you understand the entire bankruptcy process, but he or she will also help you to determine the smartest and most effective ways to recover.

Before you work with just any attorney, however, you need to consider whether or not he or she has YOUR best interests in mind, or whether he or she is just looking to take in some consulting fees. What does that mean? Unless the attorney is providing access to a free consultation, it could mean that he or she is not really hoping to take on the case. don’t waste any more funds on attorneys who won\’t just speak with you briefly about the issue as this indicates that you are not the priority…and you should be!