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Social Security

get you the benefits you deserve

We can help you get the benefits you deserve.

You spend your working years contributing to Social Security so you’ll have income after you retire. But did you know you may also qualify for Social Security Disability Benefits if you become disabled before you retire? If you are injured, sick or suffer from any physical or mental medical problem that leaves you unable to work, you may be entitled to Social Security benefits.

The process of obtaining benefits from the Social Security System is confusing, time consuming and all-to-often unfair. The majority of people who apply for early Social Security Disability Benefits are turned down. The Social Security Disability attorneys of Brock & Stout can help you cut through the red tape to get the money you deserve.

Brock & Stout’s Social Security Disability attorneys are dedicated to helping people like you level the playing field so you have the best opportunity to receive the benefits you deserve. Brock & Stout charges no fees or costs until we win your claim. Our Social Security Disability attorneys offer a free consultation to all potential claimants. Let Brock & Stout analyze your case, plan a strategy to be successful, and implement a plan that will start you on your way to a better quality of life with the benefits you deserve.

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Brock & Stout - Social Security

Reasons to Contact Brock & Stout Today


If your thinking of filing for Social Security


If you’ve been denied Social Security benefits


If you’d like a free Case Evaluation

How does Social Security Disability work?

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When people refer to Social Security disability, they are normally referring to Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI), which is an income replacement program for people who have worked and contributed into the Social Security program but are now unable to work due to a physical or mental impairment. The amount awarded to the disabled claimant is based on the amount of money the claimant earned and contributed to the Social Security program in the past.

Another type of Social Security disability program is called Supplemental Security Income (SSI). This program is primarily a need-based program that pays benefits to people who otherwise are not able to earn a living because of a severe physical or mental impairment. Regardless of whether the claimant has worked in the past, eligibility is based purely on financial need and physical or mental disability. There are many rules which dictate whether the Social Security Administration will consider a person to be disabled and financially in need. Let the Attorneys at Brock & Stout help you navigate through the Social Security system and help get you approved as soon as possible.

We’ve prepared this Social Security video presentation for you.

Am I eligible for Social Security Disability?

Many people ask the question, “How do I qualify for Social Security Disability?” Unfortunately, there is no easy answer to that question. Whether or not a person qualifies as disabled depends on a wide variety of factors. Below are the top five questions that need to be answered during the evaluation process.

When you apply for disability, the first step is to determine whether you are engaging in work-related activity. If so, how much money do you earn? If you are not working at all or if you are working and earning less than $1,000 per month, you may be eligible for disability benefits.
The second step is to determine whether you have a “severe” impairment. Are you limited in ordinary activities such as standing, sitting, walking, lifting or other activities? Do you have problems with depression or anxiety? A “severe” impairment may be physical or mental. If you do not have a “severe” impairment, your claim is denied at this step. If you have one or more impairments, your claim proceeds to the next step.
The third step is to determine whether your “severe” impairment satisfies the disability criteria specified by the Social Security Administration. Social Security has a list of medical impairments divided into categories. Social Security then specifies different disability criteria for each impairment. If your disability satisfies the criteria of a listed impairment, you are considered disabled.
In order to determine whether a claimant is truly disabled, Social Security has to decide if the claimant can return to the same type of work that he or she has done in the past. If they determine you are no longer able to able to perform the duties required by previous jobs you have had in the past, your claim will proceed to the next step.
The fifth and final step is to determine whether your impairment prevents you from doing other types of jobs with your limitations and abilities.

Get a free Social Security case evaluation

Just fill out the form below and we will review your case for free.

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Are you a working and earning more than $1,000 per month?
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Please tell us about your disability

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